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Posts tagged music writing

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Concert Preview- Sylvan Esso

I wrote this brief to preview Sylvan Esso’s Seattle show for Seattle Weekly. You can also read this brief here.

With “Coffee” from its self-titled debut, Sylvan Esso—that’s Amelia Meath of Mountain Man and Nick Sanborn of Megafaun—have created an unassuming pop hit. Meath’s sweet-and-low vocals and the track’s electro-pop backbone pair in such a way that “Coffee” wouldn’t seem out of place at either a club or an open-mike night. Just try to get it out of your head. With Dana Buoy. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $12. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under Sylvan Esso Coffee Amelia Meath Mountain Man Nick Sanborn Megafaun Seattle Weekly music writing music journalism freelance writing

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Concert Previews- Jack Johnson, Bradford Loomis and Beth Whitney

I wrote these briefs to preview upcoming shows by Jack Johnson and Bradford Loomis and Beth Whitney for Seattle Weekly. You can also read these briefs here.

Singer/songwriter/surfer/filmmaker Jack Johnson is nothing if not consistent. For more than a dozen years, he’s churned out sun-soaked jams, most recently on From Here to Now to You. There are funkier grooves throughout the album, but Johnson mostly sticks to what he knows: upbeat acoustic songs about life and love. With Amos Lee, Michael Kiwanuka, Bahamas. The Gorge, 754 Silica Rd., Quincy, Wash., 509-785-6262, gorgeamphitheatre.net. 6:30 p.m. $57 and up. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

The Banner Days, a collaboration by local singer/songwriters Bradford Loomis and Beth Whitney, could easily pass for a Swell Season release if you didn’t know better. The pair blends indie folk with a bit of soul. And like Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova, Loomis and Whitney’s voices are lovely on their own, but really shine together. With The Native Sibling, And Yet. Secret Crown Hill venue released upon purchase of tickets. bradfordloomis.com. 8:30 p.m. $12–$14. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under Jack Johnson From Here to Now to You Bradford Loomis Beth Whitney The Banner Days Seattle Weekly music writing music journalism freelance writing

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Feature Story- Fly Moon Royalty

I wrote about an awesome electro-soul duo from Seattle called Fly Moon Royalty for The Inlander. You can also read this article here.

Work It

Seattle’s Fly Moon Royalty isn’t afraid of a little ‘world domination’ with its music

By Azaria Podplesky

Singer Adriene “Adra Boo” Green and producer/DJ Mike “Action Jackson” Sylvester, aka electro-soul duo Fly Moon Royalty, are no strangers to elbow grease. After all, they met while working at a restaurant in Seattle.

"As soon as he said he was a producer, it was like, ‘Boom!’" Green says their connection.

Once the duo began working together, other musical projects took a backseat, and the pair released its self-titled debut in 2011.

Rave reviews from the likes of Seattle and City Arts magazines, which named Fly Moon Royalty one of the city’s best new bands and best local band, respectively, performances supporting soul band Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings and Chewelah native Allen Stone, and 2012’s Dimensions EP propelled the band into early 2014 and the release of its second EP, Unfinished Business — much of which was heard at the duo’s stunning Marmot Fest set last month.

The five-track EP was the product of the duo’s unstoppable work ethic, culled from extra songs Green and Sylvester had in their arsenal.

"The EP was called Unfinished Business because those songs were that,” Sylvester says. “We have a full-length album that no one’s heard yet. It’s some of our best work, in my opinion. It’s hard to sit on it … But we thought we needed to take care of unfinished business before releasing that.”

Read more …

Filed under Fly Moon Royalty Adriene Green Mike Sylvester Adra Boo Action Jackson electro-soul Seattle Weekly music writing music journalism freelance writing

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Concert Preview- LeAnn Rimes

I wrote this brief to preview LeAnn Rimes’ Seattle show for Seattle Weekly. You can also read this brief here.

Did you know LeAnn Rimes released an album last year? If you didn’t, you’re not alone. In recent years, Rimes’ love life (which includes a divorce, an affair, a second marriage to actor Eddie Cibrian, and a rumored feud with his ex) has overshadowed her career. Which is unfortunate for the country crooner; Spitfire is a fun mix of feisty and heartfelt tunes. Snoqualmie Casino, Mountain View Plaza, 37500 S.E. North Bend Way, 425-888-1234, snocasino.com. 7 p.m. $20 and up. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under LeAnn Rimes Spitfire Seattle Weekly music writing music journalism freelance writing

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Concert Preview- Second Annual Columbia City Blues Festival

I wrote this brief to preview the Second Annual Columbia City Blues Festival for Seattle Weekly. You can also read this preview here.

As festival season winds down, the diverse lineup of the Second Annual Columbia City Blues Festival will fill you up with enough soul to last until Bumbershoot. In the mood for some rootsy blues? Singer Betsy Olson, with drummer Sera Cahoone, is on it. Want to shimmy to a blend of Delta blues and rock & roll? Gravel Road has got you covered. Hoping to catch a bit of “antifolk”? Stick around for the Foghorns. With Michael Wohl, Fat Yap Harwood & the Thesaurusauruses, The Scotch Tops, Bigfoot Wallace and His Wicked Sons. Through Sunday. Columbia City Theater, 4918 Rainier Ave. S., 723-0088, columbiacitytheater.com. 9 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 p.m. Sunday. $8 adv./$10 DOS. 21 and older. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under Second Annual Columbia City Blues Festival Betsy Olson Sera Cahoone Gravel Road The Foghorns music writing music journalism freelance writing Seattle Weekly

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Concert Previews- Portugal. The Man, Broken Bells

I wrote these briefs to preview upcoming shows by Portugal. The Man and Broken Bells for Seattle Weekly. You can also read these briefs here.

In April, Portland-by-way-of-Alaska rock quartet Portugal. The Man created something unheard of: a song that would become extinct unless it was reproduced. In partnership with Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute, the band sent 400 copies of “Sumatran Tiger” on degradable vinyl to “influencers” including actors, musicians, conservationists, and journalists, each record representing one of the 400 Sumatran tigers in the wild. The song, which has slowly spread through hashtags like #EndangeredSong and #SumatranTiger, features P.TM’s psychedelic touch and the repeated line “You don’t have to worry.” Those words, we hope, predict a brighter future for the endangered-tiger population. With Grouplove, Typhoon. Marymoor Park, 6046 W. Lake Sammamish Pkwy. N.E., Redmond., 205-3661, marymoor concerts.com. 6:30 p.m. $35 adv./$40 DOS. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

For its second studio album, After the Disco, musician and producer Brian Burton (aka Danger Mouse) and the Shins’ James Mercer, who perform together as Broken Bells, were inspired by retro-futurism and the somewhat kooky way science-fiction books of yesteryear envisioned the future. Using instruments from the ’60s and ’70s to bring that retro influence to life, Burton and Mercer created what could be the soundtrack to a movie set in a mysterious, far-off galaxy, one featuring both synth-driven grooves (“After the Disco”) and darker ballads (“The Angel and the Fool”). The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org/moore. 7:30 p.m. $43.50. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under Portugal. The Man Sumatran Tiger Broken Bells After the Disco Seattle Weekly music writing freelance writing music journalism

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Concert Preview- Chvrches

I wrote this brief to preview Chvrches’ upcoming Seattle shows for Seattle Weekly. You can also read this brief here.

The last time Chvrches played Seattle, the Scottish electro-pop trio kicked off 107.7 The End’s Deck the Hall Ball at the un-rockly hour of 3 p.m., thanking the crowd for coming early to see its set. This time, after nearly a year of touring and the popularity of its debut album, The Bones of What You Believe, and singles like “The Mother We Share” and “Recover,” the band has expanded its Seattle stop to two nights. That’s two chances to hear this group’s synthy, layer-upon-layer rock, topped by lead singer Lauren Mayberry’s ringing, crystal-clear voice. Through Friday. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showboxonline.com. 9 p.m. $30. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under Chvrches The Bones of What You Believe The Mother We Share Recover Seattle Weekly music writing music journalism freelance writing journalism

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Concert Previews- Lady Lamb the Beekeeper, STRFKR, Hot Bodies In Motion

I wrote these briefs for Seattle Weekly to preview shows by Lady Lamb the Beekeeper, STRFKR and Hot Bodies In Motion. You can also read these briefs here.

In June, Lady Lamb the Beekeeper, aka Aly Spaltro, posted a video from a recording session on Instagram, confirming that her second studio album, the follow-up to last year’s Ripely Pine, is in the works. Based on this sneak peek, fans can expect lots of bluesy guitar riffs and soulful vocals on the Maine native’s next release. With the Sadies. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 9 p.m. $15. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

STRFKR (DJ set) The diversity of Miracle Mile, the latest album from this Portland electronic quartet, makes the band an obvious choice for a DJ set. Singles released thus far have ranged from synth-rock (“Atlantis”) to disco-tinged (“While I’m Alive”) and ’60s-esque pop-rock (“Beach Monster”). No doubt the band will bring that grab-bag attitude to its set. And glitter, hopefully. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15 adv. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Dry those tears, Hot Bodies In Motion fans. This isn’t a farewell show, just the last time the current lineup will perform together. The soulful rock quartet, which formed in 2010 and released Principle A last year, mentions “structural changes” on Facebook. The band doesn’t go into detail, but the same comment says the writing core will remain the same. With SISTERS, Fauna Shade. Tractor Tavern. 9:30 p.m. $10. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under Lady Lamb the Beekeeper Ripely Pine STRFKR Miracle Mile Hot Bodies In Motion Principle A Seattle Weekly music journalism music writing freelance writing

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Concert Preview- A Tribe Called Red

I wrote this brief to preview A Tribe Called Red’s Seattle show for Seattle Weekly. You can also read this brief here.

Canadian trio A Tribe Called Red brings a unique perspective to dance music, combining hip-hop and electronic music with elements of aboriginal music like chanting and percussion to make “powwow step,” most recently showcased on its latest, Nation II Nation. ATCR also created Electric Powwow, a monthly event featuring indigenous DJs, to further this eclectic sound. With Riz Rollins, J Justice. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $15 adv. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Filed under A Tribe Called Red Seattle Weekly music writing music journalism freelance writing

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Album Review- The Pharmacy

I reviewed the Pharmacy’s Spells for Seattle Weekly. You can also read this review here.

The Pharmacy, Spells (out Aug. 12, Old Flame Records, thepharmacyband.com) Throughout its 12 years, The Pharmacy has experimented with just about every genre, from fuzzed-out punk to alt-rock. Now with Spells, the band’s fifth full-length, the trio wades deeper into the psychedelic waters it dipped into on 2012’s Stoned & Alone. A quick listen, six of Spells ’s 10 songs clock in at less than three minutes. Tracked live with producer Kyle Brunette (Night Beats), there’s a raw yet mellow energy to it. Some songs, like “Anna Bella,” play at a leisurely pace, while tracks like “Masten Lake Lagoon” pick up the tempo. And though the majority of Spells, written in a cabin in Big Sur and recorded in the basement of a used-car museum in Tacoma, is hazy in nature, there are a few surprises throughout—like the doo-wop-influenced vocals on the punky “Cool and Calm.” There’s a relaxed vibe to singer/guitarist Scottie Yoder’s voice, and drummer Brendhan Bowers and keyboardist Stefan Rubicz follow suit, letting the band’s easy rapport shine through.

Next Show: Wed., July 30, Sunset Tavern

Filed under The Pharmacy Spells album review Seattle Weekly music writing music journalism freelance writing